Feedback to Improve Virtual Assistant Performance

Jul 14, 2019 | Virtual Assistants | 0 comments

Feedback to Improve Virtual Assistant Performance

Virtual Assistants | 0 comments

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Written by Nick Mowery

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How should we give feedback to improve our virtual assistant’s performance?  How much and how often, and how fearlessly candid should we be?  Telling our VAs what steps to follow or what factual knowledge they’re lacking can be truly useful, if they’re unaware of a critical fact about the process, then you should tell them.  Feedback is about telling people what we think of their performance and how they should do it better.  But, what research has found is that telling our employees and co-workers what we think of their performance doesn’t help them thrive and excel, and telling them how we think they should improve actually hinders learning.

Feedback is more distortion than truth, our evaluation is deeply altered by our own understanding of what we’re rating others on, our own sense of what good looks like for a particular skill or task, and our own internal viewpoint.  All we can really do is hare our own feelings and experiences, our own reactions.  In this way, we can tell our employees whether they’re persuasive to us; whether their presentation was boring to us; how their design impacted us.  We may not be able to tell them where they stand, but we can tell them where they stand with us.  Those are our truths, not theirs,  This is a humbler claim, but at least it’s accurate. 

If you witness your employee doing something that really works stopping them and dissecting it with them should be your highest priority.  By helping them recognize what excellence looks like you’re offering them the chance to gain insight; you’re highlighting a pattern that is already there within them so they can recognize it, anchor it, re-create it, and refine it.  THAT IS LEARNING!

How to give people feedback is one of the hottest topics in business today.  The argument for providing radical candor and transparency have a swagger to them.  And, as leaders, our ability to look at our co-workers squarely in the eye and layout their faults without blinking is a measure of our integrity.

We humans do not do well when someone whose intentions are unclear tells us where we stand, how good we really are, and what we must do to fix ourselves.  We excel only when people who know us and care about us tell us what they experience and what they feel, and in particular when they see something within us that really works. 

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